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Jul 25 2011

Health Care Information Technology - Infographic
[Via: Carrington College's Health Information Technology Program]

The Increasing Cost of Health Care

Health care costs in the United States have continued to rise steadily for quite a few years, and they show no sign of slowing down. At the same time, there is a large and growing percentage of the population with no health care coverage at all and an even larger percentage that depends on government-funded health insurance for their health care needs. These factors are making good health care a luxury available only to the wealthy.

Why do health care costs continue to increase? There are various reasons driving the increase of health care costs in the U.S. A population that is growing older and therefore needs additional services has been cited as part of the reason for higher health care costs. The U.S. population is living longer, but that longevity also includes many chronic illness sufferers who need long-term treatment. This also impacts the costs of health care.

The development of new technology and medications has also affected the costs of health care. The companies developing the new technology and medications have to raise costs to recoup their initial investments. Additionally, patients prefer using the newer products, even when there is no need, increasing demand for more costly services.

The health insurance system is another culprit. The cost of insurance premiums, both for individuals and families, is quite high nationwide and continues to increase. Even though most people covered under health insurance are covered by plans through their jobs and the companies cover most of their premiums, the premiums have risen steadily for the past 5 years. Premiums for private insurance also increase sharply as people get older. However, as people get older, they do qualify for Medicare, which is government-funded health insurance for senior citizens and some disabled persons.

Finally, administrative costs also have an impact on the increasing health care costs. These costs include things such as marketing, billing and payroll and only help in causing health care costs to continue increasing.

As the costs of medical treatments, operations and health insurance continue to increase, many people are left without any viable avenues for their health care. Since about 13 percent of the population does not carry health insurance at all and about 27 percent depends on government-funded health insurance, there are many surgeries and treatments that are simply not an option. Preventive medicine might be one way to manage the increasing costs. If more money is invested in prevention now, there is less chance that costly, chronic illnesses will develop later.

CareerExplorer has a great number of schools in the health care industry, feel free to use our school search or job search tools to find the best career path for you.

By Career Explorer

May 18 2011

college-text-books

Source: OnlineSchools.org

With the rising costs of tuition and textbooks at Universities and Colleges, a new movement of open source text books has begun. Which is great for students who may have to drop out of school because they cannot cover all of their expenses. The bad news is that the open source books may never be widely available thanks to old-school publishers trying to squash the idea.

By Career Explorer

Apr 19 2011

Hacking is a general term that refers to the reconfiguration or reprogramming of a computer system in order to allow an outsider who wouldn’t otherwise have access to that system to gain entrance. It is an art and a dark science that has been around ever since the dawn of computers themselves. Hacking is often used by the mainstream media to refer to all types of electronics manipulation including “phreaking” and “cracking.” It is a catch-all term that has fallen securely into place as a handle for any outside manipulation of electronic devices, even though in the real world of hacking it refers to a specific type of manipulation.

“Hacker” is a word invented in the 1940s by mathematician John Forbes Nash Jr., played by Russell Crowe in the movie “A Beautiful Mind.” Meaning it as a derogatory term, Nash used it to refer to anyone looking for a quick way around a problem.

In 1972, it was discovered that a cereal box whistle emitted a frequency that would authorize long distance calls when played into a phone. This is considered one of the first technology hacks.

In 1981, a hacker named Ian Murphy was the first to be convicted of a felony when he broke into AT&T systems and switched their discount rates to daytime hours.

A hacker named Kevin Mitnick made it to the US Most Wanted list after hacking into a number of phone and computer companies. Some believed he could cause the launching of a nuclear device simply by whistling into any public phone.

Allegedly searching for little green men, Gary McKinnon broke into US Navy, Air Force, Army, Defense Department, and NASA web sites in what some consider the greatest military hack ever.

The US leads the world with thirteen percent of the planet’s spam sent from hacked computers within its borders. Cheap online hacking universities in China lead the world in revenue generated with an annual $40 million profit.

Across the globe, intellectual property amounting to around $1 trillion has been stolen by hackers. This is in addition to an annual $4 billion in damages in the US caused by hackers and $1 billion in China. According to a Symantec survey performed in 2009, slightly less than half the businesses surveyed had been hacked and lost valuable information. It is said that a third of companies have to face daily hack attacks, 17 percent of which manage to gain entry. Hackers attempt to break into power plants thousands of times per year. Successful attempts extort millions of dollars annually.

Around 250 professional hackers are hired every year by the Defense Department to protect the US from malicious hackers. Job applicants are given a thorough career assessment of their past life and must pass a challenging aptitude test. The Pentagon invested $6 billion into computer safety measures in 2009 alone. This figure is expected to at least double in the next five years.

Some of the most often hacked sites include Facebook and other social networks.

By Career Explorer

Apr 14 2011

Don’t overlook working for Ronald & Company…

job-search

McDonald's is hiring

“Explore a golden opportunity!” That’s what the job application states at McDonald’s, and in all honestly, they might not be kidding.

According to emerging signs in the recent economic recovery, McDonald’s plans on hiring near 50,000 people later this month –better yet, in a single day – on April 19th.

A large part of this massive hiring move is due to more golden arched locations staying open 24 hours, in addition to America’s “jobless recovery.” To put it simply, several of the chains are in need of more and more people – daily. In fact, people who had at one time never considered the food colossus are now changing their minds as a result of the growing opportunities available to them. No longer is McDonald’s just a place for prepubescent teens to find work during high school – it’s become more than just a McJob, it’s become a career ladder of opportunity.

Despite all the negativity Micky D’s received after documentaries like 2004’s Supersize Me hit theaters – spawning a growing concern for high-calorie foods in an already unhealthy America – the fast-food kingpin has shifted its reputation into a company built on helping sculpt careers. Now that doesn’t mean that every drive-thru and grease fryer is going to end up owning a location or sitting in a desk that says CEO, but it does show promise knowing that most of McDonald’s higher ups have had to ask at some time or another “What kind of drink would you like with your value meal?”

If you’re looking for a career – a growing career with plenty of outlook and opportunities, don’t overlook the big M. Good news is that if you do move up the corporate chain, you’ll already be used to wearing a shirt and tie to work every day – minus the name tag. If you aren’t sure what you want to do with you life, take our free career assessment to get a feel for what line of work may fit you best.

By Career Explorer

Mar 31 2011

Technology in the Classroom

The more technology is developing in our country, the more parents, teachers, and administrators are concerned about making sure that students understand how to use it. Schools are now integrating technology into the curriculum This can involve training in the use of computers, navigating the internet, and exposure to virtual classrooms. These schools also make options available such as career assessment tools, postsecondary education courses, AP testing aides, or credit recovery.

The standards used to determine the scores of each state were divided into two groups: capacity and use. The capacity a state has was determined by how adequately trained the teachers and administrators are, whether their initial license requires technology courses, and if it requires ongoing technology training or testing as a part of relicensing. The use of a state was determined by whether a state has a standard requiring technology education, tests students on technology, establishes virtual schools, and establishes computer-based assessments.

Surprisingly, most of the highly integrated states are located in the Southeast. They also offer the most additional options such as state standards for technology education, required technology courses, virtual schools, and computer based assessments. These states are some of the most economically depressed, and yet, they offer students the most in technology education.

New England was only average in their technology leadership scores and offered only a few of the options that the Southeast offered. New England, however, is the most economically healthy region in the union. Many of these states offered only state standards and computer-based assessments.

The three lowest scoring states were Montana, Nevada, and the District of Columbia. Montana is one of the more prosperous states in the unions though, just as with the case of New England. The District of Columbia failed outrightly. While the District of Columbia is only a province, they are still equipped with federal funding and school systems.

The mention of the economic stability of the region is to demonstrate that these statistics do not align with the assumption that economic stability ensures technology advances within school systems. These schools offer nothing more than a state standard and in all three cases they failed in their ability to provide the capacity for technology education. That means that students had barely any education in technology presented to them during their federally funded education.

The importance of training students in technology in preparation for their future cannot be stressed enough. Whether it’s providing them with the opportunity to take a simple job aptitude test or give them college credit through virtual classrooms, students need the chance to grow with technology. Yet, it’s surprising exactly where these students would have to go in order to gain the most technologically advanced education. States such as West Virginia, Georgia, and South Dakota are some of the last states that people would think of. Yet, some of the states that people would expect great technology opportunities from such as Vermont, California, or Connecticut are providing only average scores.

By Career Explorer